Case Studies


Case Studies

Click on these headings to go to a particular category, or scroll down to see the complete  list.

Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
 
Good agricultural practices beneficial for income, health 
  A story about how Mr Khamphou Phanthaboun and Mr Sounan Heuangpaseuth and other Lao vegetable farmers took part in Farmer Field Schools and decided to reduce or stop using pesticides altogether. The story explains how environmentally sustainable farming practices can help farmers in Laos increase land productivity, raise their income while also helping make their crops safe for consumers and themselves. [1 pdf file, 1 page, 406 Kb]
Farmers Learn Value of Wet Season Tomato Crop
  A report on how farmers who learned new techniques and took a Farmer Field School course under the Laos National IPM Programme achieved good results without the use of chemicals contrary to the belief of many farming families that growing tomatoes in the rainy season results in poor yields if they do not use chemical pesticides. [1 pdf file, 2 pages, 537.52 Kb]
The Happy IPM Farmer
  The story of Name Name from Cambodia who grows vegetables such as cauliflower, yard long bean, eggplant, cucumber and orange without chemicals and produces special types of mushrooms which fetch a high price at the market. [1 pdf file, 5 pages, 950.12 Kb]
How Rice Farmers Clean Up the Environment, Conserve Biodiversity, Raise More Food, Make Higher Profits
  A case study of the production and environmental consequences of policy decisions by the government of Indonesia, the world's fifth most populous country and its third largest rice producer. In this paper the "agriculture" and the "environment" viewpoints are not just complementary; they are inseperable. Ecological research is used to explain paradoxical agronomic field results and to make agricultural policy recommendations. [1 pdf file, 58 pages, 3.74 Mb]
A comparison of two IPM training strategies in China: the importance of concepts or the rice ecosystem for sustainable insect pest management
  Mangan, J., and M.S.Mangan 1998. A comparison of two IPM training strategies in China: the importance of concepts or the rice ecosystem for sustainable insect pest management. Agriculture and Human Values 15: 209-221. [1 pdf file, 22 pages, 74.61 Kb]
Beyond the Farmer Field School: IPM and Empowerment in Indonesia
  Ooi, P. A. C. 1998. Beyond the Farmer Field School: IPM and Empowerment in Indonesia. International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) Gatekeeper Series No. 78. London. 16 pp. (Originally presented at the International Conference of IPM - Theory and Practice, Developing Sustainable Agriculture, Guangzhou, China June 15 - 20, 1998) [1 pdf file, 16 pages, 62.96 Kb]
ICT and IPM
  Bartlett, A.P. 2002. ICT and IPM. In Farmers, FAO and Field School: Bringing IPM to the grass roots in Asia. Food and Agriculture Organisation Farmers, in press. [1 pdf file, 13 pages, 62.63 Kb]
Reducing Vector Borne Disease by Empowering Farmers in Integrated Vector Management

Reducing vector-borne disease by empowering farmers in integrated vector management POP-UP: An evaluation of a project that uses the “farmer field school” method to teach farmers how to manage vector-borne diseases and how to improve rice yields. Teaching farmers about these two concepts together is known as “integrated pest and vector management”. [1 html file, 6 pages, 1Mb]
  Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2636366/
Insect Pest Management in Tropical Asian Irrigated Rice
IPM and Gender
 
Gender and IPM in Nepal
  The IPM team in Nepal has recognized the importance of participation by women. Short cases and a list of 'challenges' are included in this colourful report. [1 pdf file, 10 pages, 496.45 Kb]
Stories from the Field: Women Working Towards a Non-toxic Environment
 

A compilation of stories of 25 women from five countries who are involved in an inspiring, ongoing campaign to eliminate use of chemical pesticides and promote agroecology in the Mekong Region. These women are part of the programme Towards a Non-toxic South-East Asia, a programme aiming to reduce health and environmental risks from chemicals by monitoring, regulating and managing agricultural, industrial and consumer chemicals. [1 pdf file, 98 pages, 6.48 Mb]

Agroecosystem Analysis
Living Soils and Growing Healthy Root Systems
Biological Alternatives
Adult Nonformal Education
 
Sustainable Intensification of Agricultural Production: The Essential Role of Ecosystem-Literacy Education for Smallholder Farmers in Asia
  Ketelaar, J.W. and A.L. Abubakar 2012. Case studies on how FAO successfully employed IPM farmer education strategies using the innovative and adult-education-based Farmer Field Schools. The case highlights the importance of educating millions of Asian farmers to become ecology-literate and better managers as to achieve global food security. The paper also highlights policy lessons learned, at national and global level, with regards to the pivotal role that farmer education plays for sustainable intensification of agricultural production. [copies available for purchase online]
Community IPM
 
A Village Planning Meeting, Yen Phuong Village, Vietnam
  A case study documenting how groups of farmers, the core of IPM programmes, emerge from field schools ready to engage in discovery processes to find solutions to crop protection and production challenges as well as a broader set of problems which confront their communities. Driven by the desire to learn more and given the opportunity to get together in forums, such as a planning meeting, IPM farmers acquire a more holistic understanding of agriculture. A chain of changes follow, all leading to sustaining and strengthening farmers' groups and the development of local IPM movements. [1 pdf file, 31 pages, 824.75 Kb]
Kaligondang: A Case History of an IPM Sub-district
  An account of how a local IPM programme developed over a period of 7 years. Includes descriptions of how Field Schools, Studies, Workshops and Meetings were conducted. [1 pdf file, 60 pages, 182 Kb]
Facilitating the Emergence of Local Institutions
  Dilts, R 1999. Facilitating the Emergence of Local Institutions: Reflections from the experience of the Community IPM Programme in Indonesia. In Asian Productivity Organisation Role of Institutions in Rural Community Development: Report of the APO Study Meeting in Colombo, 21-29 Sep 1998. pp.50-65 [1 pdf file, 19 pages, 102.33 Kb]
Farmers in Indonesia: Escaping the Trap of Injustice
  Paper delivered by Rahmat Hidayat, Indonesian IPM Farmers Association at the Seminar and Workshop on Corporate Farming —Challenge to the 2nd Green Revolution in November 2000 at Hotel Jayakarta, Yogyakarta [1 pdf file, 10 pages, 186 Kb]
Rural Ecology and Agricultural Livelihoods (REAL)
 
Growing Up in the REAL World: The FAO Experience
  Growing up in the REAL world. Learning about rural ecology and agricultural livelihoods in Thai schools. [1 pdf file, 3 pages, 402.41 Kb]
Farmer Life Schools
 
Farmer Perceptions of Farmer Life Schools
  An analysis of the impacts of Farmer Life Schools in Cambodia. [1 pdf file, 5 pages, 102.30 Kb]
Farmer Empowerment through Farmer Life Schools
  The report of a project in Cambodia in which IPM farmer trainers facilitated Human Ecosystem Analysis (HESA). Written by Nguon Sokuthea, 2002 [1 pdf file, 8 pages, 193.47 Kb] INCORPORATED 21 FEBRUARY 2012
A Development Strategy to Empower Rural Farmers and Prevent HIV
  The report on the process of mainstream HIV resilience building in the agricultural sector through Farmer Life Schools. The innovative FLS approach translates farmer's analytical thinking from plant ecosystem-base into analysing an individual's life as a human ecosystem – with factors that strengthen or weaken his/her resilience to adversities, which includes HIV. [1 pdf file, 22 pages, 1.31 Mb] INCORPORATED 21 FEBRUARY 2012
IPM and Marketing
 
Packaging in Fresh Produce Supply Chains in Southeast Asia
  The publication documents the results of surveys commissioned by FAO in three countries – the Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam – to provide comprehensive up-to-date reviews on fresh produce packaging in the region's supply chains. It provides the basis of FAO's future work in the area of capacity building on fresh produce packaging in the region. [1 pdf file, 146 pages, 5.58 Mb]

Improving Myanmar’s Mango Supply Chain: Success Starts at the Plantation A story about how the Common Fund for Commodities (CFC) through FAO assisted producers in Myanmar improve the fresh mango supply chain creating higher quality produce for different markets and increasing profit margins. [1 pdf file, 2 pages, 331 Kb]

Fresh fruit supply chain for mangoes, Myanmar

A story about how the Government of Myanmar, international organizations and private sector assisted producers in Myanmar improve the fresh mango supply chain creating higher quality produce and different products for different markets - including export markets - and increasing profit margins. [1 pdf file, 1 pages, 1 Mb] 
Pesticide Management and Pesticides and Health
 
Did You Take Your Poison Today?
  The publication documents the results of surveys commissioned by FAO in three countries – the Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam – to provide comprehensive up-to-date reviews on fresh produce packaging in the region's supply chains. It provides the basis of FAO's future work in the area of capacity building on fresh produce packaging in the region. [1 pdf file, 146 pages, 5.58 Mb]
Participatory Rapid Appraisal of Mungbean Production and Protection Practices in Cambodia
  The report on PRA surveys on the current situation of pesticide distribution and use for control of pest and disease problems in mungbean production around the Tonle Sap lake. The report would be the basis for future IPM/Pesticide Risk Reduction training and action research interventions, possibly to be supported by FAO under the ongoing Pesticide Risk Reduction Project. [1 pdf file, 17 pages, 544.66 Kb]
  Helen Murphy, Arik Sanusi, Russ Dilts, et. al. published in the Journal of Agromedicine. 1999. This study demonstrated that women vegetable farmers in Sumatra use pesticides in a highly unsafe manner. The report has a large number of tables and photos which clearly show the appalling manner in which pesticides are stored and applied. [1pdf file, 25 pages, 531 Kb]
  Helen Murphy, Arik Sanusi, Russ Dilts, et. al. published in the Journal of Agromedicine. 2000. This study assessed the reproductive impacts of pesticide use. The rates of stillbirths, abortions, early neonatal deaths, and low birth weight were not greater among the pesticide users. Although there were more cases of undocumented birth defects, the difference was not significant. [1pdf file, 17 pages, 1.22 Mb]
  Kishi M, Hirschhorn N, Djajadisastra M, Satterlee LN, et. al. published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health. 1995. This study assessed correlations between exposure to pesticides and signs and symptoms of pesticide toxicity among Indonesian farmers. The study showed that spray practices substantially exposed farmers to pesticides and that for farmers in the tropics, fully protective equipment is too hot and too costly to maintain. It recommends training in integrated pest management as a way to help farmers reduce frequency of spraying and regulation of licensing and sale of the most hazardous pesticides. [1pdf file, 10 pages, 117.26 Kb]
  The report of a 1-month self- surveillance pilot in Vietnam on a farmer based surveillance system in one community aimed at raising awareness of the health effects of pesticides and provide the community opportunity to take preventive action or develop community solutions to address pesticide poisoning. [1pdf file, 9 pages, 310.80 Kb]
  Helen H Murphy, Nguyen Phung Hoan, Patricia Matteson, et. al. published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2002. The report of a 12-month pilot programme in Vietnam designed to determine whether farmers could use a simple self-reporting system to estimate the incidence of occupationally-related , self-limited pesticide poisonings; describe the frequencies and types of pesticide products used in spraying operations; and assess whether self-reporting and feedback would influence spraying behaviors. The low-cost surveillance method influenced the behaviors of farmers given access to IPM Farmer Field Schools and demonstrated the value of farmers as key informants. [1pdf file, 11 pages, 2.28 Mb]
Acute Pesticide Poisoning among Female and Male Cotton Growers in India
  Francesca Mancini, Ariena H.C. van Bruggen, Janice L.S. Jiggins, et. al. published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2005. The report on a season-long assessment of acute pesticide poisoning among farmers conducted in three villages in India. The study documented the serious consequences of pesticide use for the health of farmers, particularly women field helpers. The survey aimed primarily to raise farmers' awareness of the seriousness of the pesticide poisoning occurring in the villages. [1pdf file, 12 pages, 1.84 Mb]
  Francesca Mancini, Janice L.S. Jiggins, Michael O'Malley, et. al. published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2009. Sixty-five farmers reported on pesticide use and the signs and symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning when using two different plant protection strategies: in 2003 using chemical controls and in 2004 using an approach to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) based on an ecological analysis of the field conditions. Exposure to organophosphates was confirmed as a serious risk factor for occupational poisoning. The adoption of IPM reduced the use of pesticides and halved the incidence of acute pesticide poisoning. restricting the use of highly toxic compounds and educating farmers on IPM are proposed as interventions to minimize pesticide poisoning in India and other countries with similar rural conditions. [1pdf file, 10 pages, 359 Kb]
Death in Small Doses
Situation Analysis: Farmers Awareness and Perceptions of the effect of pesticides on their health
Acute Pesticide Poisoning: A Major Global Health Problem
Food Safety
Save and Grow
 
Save and Grow: Mininum Tillage Potato IPM in Rice-based Cropping Systems in Vietnam
  A case study on how minimum tillage potato growing using IPM in lowland rice production systems in Vietnam increased profits from growing potatoes by 60-73% and addresses issues such as urbanization and migration of rural youth to nearby cities in search of better-paid employment opportunities leaving farm activities mostly women and the elderly. [1 pdf file, 2 pages, 276 Kb]
Save & Grow: Integrating Rice, Fish and Aquatic Biodiversity
  A story about how Vietnamese FFS farmers reduce pesticide risks and make use of biological control options for pest management instead.Farmers also integrated rice-fish-aquatic biodiversity in their production system. The case highlights how farmers explored making optimal use of multiple goods and services of paddy-based farming systems resulting in more efficient production, increased incomes and benefits. [1 pdf file, 2 pages, 900 Kb]
Boosting Farm Incomes with No Tillage Potato IPM
  Today, elderly women in the northern Vietnam Thai Binh province are growing potatoes using an innovative labour-saving method and sell the farm produce to raise money to pay for their grandchildren's school! Between 2009 and 2011, profits from growing potatoes increased by 60 to 73 percent using minimum tillage potato IPM compared with conventional potato growing methods.[1 pdf file, 2 pages, 960 Kb] 
Training of Trainers
 
IPM by Farmers: The Farmer IPM Trainers TOT Programme in Nepal
  A report by Zambani of a TOT course in Nepal in May 2000 for IPM farmers who want to become trainers. The document includes details of both the 2-day curriculum development workshop and the 10-day TOT, and includes many photos. [1 pdf file, 19 pages, 616.95 Kb]
Report of an IPM Training of Trainers Course, Nepal
  This TOT was conducted in 1999 with participants from both Government agencies and NGOs. The report consists of two files: the main text has a general description of the TOT and parallel IPM Field Schools while the Annexes include details of the curriculum, field studies, management structures and a project concept paper prepared by trainees [1 pdf file, 76 pages 307.36 Kb]
The Farmers Technical Meeting, Indonesia
  A group of 26 Farmer Trainers discuss their problems and prepare plans for IPM activities in their District. [1 pdf file, 7 pages, 84.35 Kb]
A Training of Trainers Course for IPM Farmer Trainers
  A summary of more than 30 activities used during a 7-day course for farmer trainers, prepared by Heru Setyoko, 1997. [1 pdf file, 7 pages, 84.35 Kb]
Farmer Field Schools
 
Programme Monograph From Farmer Field Schools to Community IPM: Ten Years of IPM Training in Asia
  A detailed description of the development of Farmer Field Schools, including historical context, educational foundations, ecological principles and lessons learned. [1 pdf file,121 pages, 2.13 Mb]
Entry Points for Empowerment
  Entry Points for Empowerment. Andrew Bartlett. [1pdf file, 73 pages, 815 Kb]
Farmer Field Schools to promote Integrated Pest Management in Asia: the FAO Experience
  The FAO experience. How they did it, how much it cost, and was it worth it? Find out here. [1pdf file, 15 pages, 71 Kb]
The Farmer Field School: a method for enhancing the role of rural communities in malaria control? POP-UP: Malaria has strong linkages with agriculture, and farmers in malarious regions have a central position in creating or controlling the conditions that favour disease transmission. An interdisciplinary and integrated approach is needed to involve farmers and more than one sector in control efforts. It is suggested that malaria control can benefit from a complementary intervention in rural development, the Farmer Field School (FFS) on Integrated Pest Management (IPM). This is a form of education that uses experiential learning methods to build farmers' expertise, and has proven farm-level and empowerment effects. The benefits of incorporating malaria control into the IPM curriculum are discussed. An example of a combined health-agriculture curriculum, labeled Integrated Pest and Vector Management (IPVM), developed in Sri Lanka is presented. Institutional ownership and support for IPVM could potentially be spread over several public sectors requiring a process for institutional learning and reform. [1 html file, 5 pages, 7.4Kb]
  The Farmer Field School: a method for enhancing the role of rural communities in malaria control?
Link:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1382236/
Farmers’ Journey from FFS to a Cooperative
  A story about how chilli-growing farmers from Kampong Cham province in Cambodia formed an IPM Farmers’ Club and then moved into a Cooperative to export their produce to Thailand. The members now link up with markets to assist members generate household income, improve livelihoods and contribute to the community’s socio-economic development. They have also  created savings and credit services and provides income through dividends to members geared towards supporting farmers secure capitalization for agricultural businesses and occupations.[1 pdf file, 2 pages, 900 Kb]
Beyond Farmer Field Schools
  A story about how the FFS process enhanced the capacity of farmers supported by agricultural technical officials through training and field experiments to be able to identify the problems that occur in agricultural production, and seek appropriate measures to solve problems on their own. Motivated by the results of their FFS and the desire to continue learning together, the farmers continued in post-FFS follow up activities about priority technical aspects of production and worked on group organizational and management aspects that would enable them to address other community concerns.[1 pdf file, 2 pages, 920 Kb] 
Farmer Field Studies
 
Farmer Field Research: An Analysis of Experiences in Indonesia
  Henk van den Berg et. al. This report provides a conceptual framework for Farmer Field Research, and examines five cases from Indonesia, 2001. [1 pdf file, 77 pages, 716.45 Kb]
Improving Local Cultivation of Soybean in Indonesia through Farmer's Experiments
  H. Van Den Berg and A.S. Lestari 2001. Improving Local Cultivation of Soybean in Indonesia through Farmer's Experiments. Expl Agric. 37:183-193 [1 pdf file, 11 pages, 172.32 Kb]
Science and Farmers: IPM by Farmers
  Ooi, P. A. C. 1999. Science and Farmers: IPM by Farmers. In Sivapragasam et al (Eds.) Plant Protection in the Tropics, Tropical plant protection in the information age. Proceedings of the MAPPS Fifth International Conference. pp.57-60. [doc file, 4 pages, 24.10 Kb]
Farmer's Congress
 
The Indonesian IPM Farmers Congress
  A description of a National Meeting held in July 1999. More than 540 participants represented IPM farmer groups in 12 provinces. [1 pdf file, 10 pages, 110.92 Kb]
EIQ case study
Managing Tropical Rice Pests Through Conservation of Generalist Natural Enemies and Alternative Prey

Settle, R et. al. 1996. Managing Tropical Rice Pests Through Conservation of Generalist Natural Enemies and Alternative Prey. Ecology 77(7): 1975-1988. [1 pdf file, 15 pages, 177 Kb]

Claim No Easy Victories: Evaluating the Pesticide Industry's Global Safe Use Campaign

Murray, DL and Taylor, PL 2000. Claim No Easy Victories: Evaluating the Pesticide Industry's Global Safe Use Campaign. World Development Vol. 28, No. 10: 1735-1749. [1 pdf file, 15 pages, 177 Kb]

Facilitating the Emergence of Local Institutions 
Dilts, R 1999. Facilitating the Emergence of Local Institutions: Reflections from the experience of the Community IPM Programme in Indonesia. In Asian Productivity Organisation Role of Institutions in Rural Community Development: Report  of  the APO Study Meeting in Colombo, 21-29 Sep 1998. pp.50-65 [1 pdf file, 19 pages, 102 Kb]